Category Archives: Veg patch

Back to business

Starting a new job where I’ll be in the office every day means I need to get back to the bread making and preparing all my food advance.

Here’s one of my faves: olive focaccia.

This will keep me going for most of the week. Especially along with my veggie ragout (with a courgette from the garden).

Peak courgette?

Earlier in the week or looked like the courgette yield might be dropping back a bit.

But after a few days of not checking the harder to reach corners of the patch, we’re back up to Ms production.

About 4.5Kg worth this time and definitely way more than we can keep up with.

I have actually eaten these things fur breakfast, lunch and dinner and still barely make any impact.

Courgette forest

Now, I do like growing courgettes but normally the plants are struggling a bit, the first lot of fruit go mouldy before properly developed.

But not this year.

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Just seven plants in total and although they got off to  shaky start with an early frost they have gone from strength to strength.

 

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It’s getting a bit tricky to move in between the plants to check on what’s ready to pick.

I’m not sure we’ve really done anything different this year except allowed a bit more space between each plant but they look like they’ll be delivering the goods for a while to come.

The garden in bloom

Late June and the garden is in full swing.

I’ve never been much of a one for flowers, mostly because you can’t eat them; a lot effort and all you do is look at them. And there’s also the fact that the flower beds tend to get  bit neglected and any nice plants succumb to the weeds; I’m well known for having trouble telling the difference.

But with a bit more attention to maintaining the beds, I actually don’t mind how the flowers are looking. It almost seems like we know what we’re doing.

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Mystery brassica solved

While weeding the flower bed a couple of months ago my wife spotted some cabbage-like plants that we assumed had self-seeded following our rather poor efforts at growing green veg last year.

We quickly transferred them to pots and kept them under cover away from the cabbage whites and other bugs.

They survived. And after getting some decent netting – as much for keeping randy pigeons away from the onions – they went into the soil while we waited and hoped for what would undoubtedly be our best bit of veg growing to fully develop.

The plants continue to grow but after a closer look during today’s weeding session we have to declare that we have actually got broccoli and kale.

Although we have tried growing both of these in the past, it hasn’t been for a few years now and we had pretty much given up on the idea; we’re just not good enough at gardening to pull this off.

And even though I had said I wasn’t going to work on the garden this year, we have actually ended up putting in more effort than usual, but more targeted at keeping control of the weeds and it certainly seems to be paying dividends: the courgettes and potatoes are just about ready to start picking.


I just hope we can keep it all going for a vote more months.

If only software was like growing veg

My mean time before failure with server applications is getting shorter: the simplest sample Python code I have been trying with Rabbitmq just doesn’t work and I am really bored with trying to get this stuff to work.

It’s at times like these that I really miss the therapy of weeding and planting and digging and watering; basic stuff like putting seeds in some mud; watching them grow and providing the best environment for them.

I know I said that I wasn’t doing any planting this year because the rewards don’t justify the effort, but the relaxation and therapeutic benefit certainly does.

Oh yeah, and it tastes great!

 

Who said gardening was difficult?

After rescuing a few stray cabbages before the caterpillars munch them has prompted an attempt to actually try and let them stay the course.

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That’s only one row of cabbages; the rear net is to stop the pigeons trashing the onions; there’s a row of parsnips between the two. The courgettes to the fore seem to have survived the cold. The beetroot are coming on very slowly.

The raised beds aren’t looking too bad either.

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There’s radishes, lettuce, peas, spinach and rocket.

The peppers, cucumber and tomatoes have stay hidden away in the greenhouse and no signs of any fruit yet; this time last year, the cukes were already producing.

And I have already had good usage from the (indoor) herbs: basil, chervil and dill.